NDP dumps Tom Mulcair as leader, and plenty of News from Nowhere

  

(Pictured: a photo I took of Tom Mulcair in Saskatoon for the News-Optimist when the provincial NDP were choosing a leader in 2013.)

I bring you News from Nowhere today on what has been a tumultuous weekend for the federal New Democrats in Canada. 

They held their national convention in Edmonton and earlier today delegates voted 52 to 48 percent for a leadership convention. That means Tom Mulcair is going to be done as leader, though he says he will stay on until his replacement is chosen (the convention could be held anytime in the next two years). 

This is nothing short of a stunning result and a total repudiation of Mulcair’s leadership. But it is also not surprising given how badly the NDP did in last fall’s election. Honestly, Mulcair should have stepped down long before this convention, then he could have had a graceful exit and spared himself this humiliation. But no, he decided to stay on. Well, he won’t be able to now. 

In another stunner, the convention also endorsed a motion to study their controversial hard-left LEAP Manifesto at the riding level, which is pretty much seen as a victory for the LEAP Manifesto supporters. That manifesto endorses moving away from fossil fuels, among other things, which is something nobody in the oil or energy industry in the West is going to endorse. Few people in Saskatchewan or Alberta are going to like this. Good luck on keeping seats in either province, now, NDP. 

In other news, the vote to adjourn the convention carried unanimously, which is not surprising because the delegates likely could not wait to get out of there. It’s hard to imagine any of them coming out of Edmonton enthusiastic or excited about the party or its prospects. What an implosion that was, folks, that was on display there.

May I add that this has been a rough time for the NDP lately. They just got blown out again in Saskatchewan’s election and they look like they will be violently hurled from power in Manitoba, by Brian Pallister and the Tories, next week. All in all, it is no fun to be an NDP supporter today. The NDP comes out of Edmonton looking ready for a long dry spell in the political wilderness in Canada, and the big winners from this weekend? The federal Liberals. Obviously. 

Meanwhile the federal Conservatives are getting set for their big leadership race. This week Kellie Leitch and Maxime Bernier officially filed to run, and more are expected, soon.

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So that’s that for federal political news. On to other news, now:

The big news story of the week was about the leak of the Panama Papers which exposed all the people stuffing their money in offshore trusts to avoid paying taxes! That has caused a big brouhaha and the political fallout has been immense. 

Just this week the prime minister of Iceland stepped aside over funds he had stashed in these offshore trusts. As well, it was revealed UK Prime Minister David Cameron had holdings in his father’s offshore fund as well, and the calls were on for him to resign, too. He won’t, but it has been a bad week for him regardless, politically. I would say he is far from out of the woods. 

In other news Belgium authorities say they have IDed the “man in the hat” spotted with suicide bombers at the Brussels airport.

In other Europe news, the EU may soon require visas for Canadians and Americans, which is just going to be more needless bureaucracy the world doesn’t need. 

I notice Bruce Springsteen cancelled a concert in North Carolina over their controversial LGBT laws.

The Bernie Sanders campaign continues to roll, he won Wyoming yesterday. Also, Ted Cruz cleaned up in Colorado

Also, I find this funny but Bill O’Reilly recently had a vacation in Cuba. He went on the “Factor” to talk about it and he made it sound like it was a lousy trip, the service at his “five star” hotel was substandard and he didn’t get fresh towels. My guess is O’Reilly won’t be going back to Cuba again on vacation any time soon.

I think that’s it — now, time to watch Masters golf coverage.

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